Tuesday, 21 April 2015

Boxing Etching by Joseph W. Golinkin

At Chicago – Louis and Braddock” 1938 (LITHOGRAPH: Joseph W. Golinkin)

The moment when Joe Louis downs James J. Braddock, ‘The Cinderella Man’, in the seventh round to win the world’s heavyweight championship at Chicago’s Comiskey Park. The date was June 272nd 1937. Louis, whose moniker was ‘The Brown Bomber’, became the first black world heavyweight champion since Jack Johnson. He would go on to rule the division for a period of almost 12 years and in the process make a record-setting amount of defences.

The artist, Joseph Golinkin was for want of a better term a ‘renaissance man” who excelled in art, sailoring –he rose to the rank of rear admiral in the United States Navy and- and environmental work.


TEXT: Adeyinka Makinde (2015)

Wednesday, 25 March 2015

A Mea Culpa Demand


 
Back in July 2014, I sent the following to an Igbo-Biafran nationalist who made use of quotes mis-attributed to me in a self-published book.

The letter speaks for itself.

I really do not want to get ad hominem in the quintessentially bombastically chest-pumping and self-righteous manner that is typical of the discourse between those Nigerians who consider themselves as purveyors of intellectual knowledge and paragons of truth when in fact they are essentially ‘tribal men in suits’.

There really needs to be an elevation in the general level and quality of discourse which all too frequently degenerate into tribally motivated rancour.

This man Cajetan Iwunze should do the decent thing and correct his errors and issue a civilized apology.

July 2nd 2014

Dear Mr. Cajetan Iwunze,

Cease and Desist Request - Comments wrongly attributed to Adeyinka Makinde in your book

My attention was drawn to an excerpt of a book entitled ‘The Political Constraints on Nigerian Economic Development Since The (sic) Independence’.

You are identified as the author.

A view of the relevant section of the aforementioned book at ‘Google Books’ presents the following quotations attributed to ‘Adeyinka Makinde’ culled from an edition of the Nigerian Daily Sun newspaper published on 10th December of 2007 and other sources such as the Igbo Village Newsletter of 27th January 2011 and The Guardian of 19th July 2004:

-“Where did this (sic) people get off feeling superior to other people, when it is clear that they are not?”

-“The mental disorder where the individual has delusions but does not hallucinate. In delusional disorder, also known as paranoia, the individual believes what is not true as true … believes that he is superior to other people … Igbos have a delusional disorder ( a group can have paranoia, this is called follie adeu (sic))”

I would like to put it on the record that neither of the above words were written or spoken by me.

Any comments by me in relation to the Igbos and Jews were made in two sources:

1. A talk given by me at the Jewish Museum on October 22nd of 2007 entitled ‘Igbos: A Lost Tribe of Israel’
http://adeyinkamakinde.blogspot.co.uk/…/igbos-lost-tribe-of…

2. A reply to a rejoinder to my talk by Mr. Ozodi Osuji entitled ‘The Igbo and Jewry’
http://adeyinkamakinde.blogspot.co.uk/…/03/igbo-and-jewry.h…

Mr. Osuji’s responses to my talk, respectively entitled ‘Igbos are Africans not Jews’ and ‘Igbo and Jewry: Any Connection? – A response to Mr. Adeyinka Makinde’, were published at a website named ChatAfrik.com.

The original links of Mr. Osuji’s are no longer available but have been reproduced at various sites on the World Wide Web.

This appears to be a chronologically correct thread containing my original talk and the correspondence between Mr. Osuji and myself:
http://www.nigeriansinamerica.com/…/the-igbo-a-lost-tribe-…/

At no point will you observe me using any of the quotations attributed to me in your book.

The second bulleted quote regarding delusional disorder are referenced to a Nigerian Guardian articled dated from July 2004. I had offered nothing on the subject of Igbos and Jews at this period in time.

So far as the other quote is concerned, I sent a letter to the editor of the Daily Sun stating that an article attributed to me was in fact written by Mr. Osuji and asked that this be corrected.

I received no reply.

I also issued a vigorous rebuttal to one Law Mefor who made a comment at ChatAfrik again attributing Mr. Osuji’s words to me.

This really is all down to rather sloppy research on the part of the Daily Sun, Law Mefor and now, as it turns out, you, Mr. Iwunze.

The expectation is that those who publish newspapers and those who term themselves writers ought to hold themselves to the highest standards of professional conduct including the exercising of due diligence during the research process as well as the correcting of published errors.

This, much to my regret, is a feature sadly lacking in this matter.

Therefore I would be grateful for you to do the following in future editions and/or print-on-demand batches of your book:

-Make the appropriate corrections to the relevant text and reference notes of your book which wrongly attribute certain quotations to me

-Provide a short note specifically indicating the misattribution of the quotations and a statement of apology.

If you have any queries about anything in this communication, I can be reached at adeyinkamakinde@aol.com

Yours sincerely,


Adeyinka Makinde

Monday, 5 January 2015

Adeyinka Makinde - Academic Profile Page


Biography

Adeyinka Makinde LL.B (Hons), of the Middle Temple, Barrister is the Module Leader for Criminal Law & Public Law on the Solicitors Exempting Degree. Prior to this, he delivered the Public Law option on the ILEX programme from 2002-2009.

He has authored two books on pugilists and has written numerous features on boxing and produced articles on international relations, history and culture. He has served as a programme consultant and provided expert commentary for BBC World Service Radio, China Radio International and the Voice of Russia.

He is among a group of scholars and journalists approached to contribute to the Cambridge Companion Series on the sport of boxing which is scheduled for publication in 2015.

His teaching specialism in constitutional law allied to long term interests respectively in international politics, political history, military history and the history of espionage has over the course of time germinated into a desire to develop a profile in the academic genre of ‘Intelligence and Security Studies.’ 

In May 2013 he was invited to present a paper at the biennial international conference on security issues held by the Centre for International Intelligence and Security Studies (CIISS) under the auspices of the University of Aberystwyth. 

Adeyinka’s writings, encompassing books, essays and commentaries, have been cited by a host of researchers ranging from scholars to established writers for trade published books. These include a memoir by the world renowned literary figure Chinua Achebe and an activist advocating constitutional reform in Australia. The citations span books, academic journals, an academic textbook, as well as miscellaneous reference books.

He has reviewed articles for journals including the International Journal of Criminology and Sociology.

He is an accomplished public speaker who has delivered talks before audiences in the United States and the United Kingdom. These have included GMB Trade Union-sponsored Black History Month workshops covering sports and the American Civil Rights Movement, a lecture given under the auspices of London's Jewish Museum concerning the alleged Hebraic origins of the Igbo people of Nigeria and a book launch at the Jersey City Main Library in which he presented the findings of his research into the officially unsolved 1970 murder of a Mafia-connected boxer.

Teaching

LL.B Solicitors Exempting Degree Criminal Law
LL.B Solicitors Exempting Degree Public Law
LL.B Criminal Law
LL.B Public Law
GDL Public Law
ILEX Public Law

Research

Intelligence & Security
The History and Culture of the sport of Boxing

Publications

Books:


JERSEY BOY: The Life and Mob Slaying of Frankie DePaula (iUniverse) 2010
ISBN: 978-1-45020-637-2, 274pp including b/w photographs

DICK TIGER: The Life and Times of a Boxing Immortal (Word Association) 2005
ISBN: 978-1-59571-042-0, 312pp including b/w photographs

Journal Articles:

"Boxing: Rousing the Nigerian Giant.” African Renaissance, Vol 2, No 2 March/April (2005) 68-73.

Book Reviews:

"Empire of Secrets: British Intelligence, the Cold War and the Twilight of Empire.”  Covert Policing, Terrorism and Intelligence Law Review, Vol 2, Issue 2 (2014)159-161.

Textbook Contributions:

"Pug of Ages: Weep for Me.” Essay reproduced in Writing the Synthesis Essay, edited by John Brassil et al. New Jersey: Peoples Education, 2008 13-15.

Encyclopaedia Articles:

"The Africans: Boxing and Africa" in The Cambridge Companion to Boxing, edited by Gerald Early, New York: Cambridge University Press, forthcoming 2015.

"Jose Torres: The Boxer as Writer” in The Cambridge Companion to Boxing, edited by Gerald Early, New York: Cambridge University Press, forthcoming 2015.

Conference Papers:

"Intelligence and Accountability: From the Cold War to the War on Terror.” Presented at ‘The Past, Present and Future of Intelligence’ on 25th May 2013 at Aberystwyth University under the auspices of the Centre for Intelligence and International Security Studies (CIISS).

Citations

Books

Work cited:

Makinde, Adeyinka. DICK TIGER: The Life and Times of a Boxing Immortal. Word Association, May 2005.

Cited in the following books:

Oliver, Brian. The Commonwealth Games: Extraordinary Stories Behind the Medals. Bloomsbury Sport, May 2014.

Torromeo, Dario; Esposito, Franco. I Pugni Degli Eroi .Absolutely Free Editore, Dec 2013.

Achebe, Chinua. There Was A Country: A Personal History of Biafra. Allen Lane, Sept. 2012.

Hall, Karen L. Game Plan: A Social History of Sport in Alberta. University of Alberta Press, Jun 2012.

Hudson, David L. Boxing in America: An Autopsy. Praeger Publishers, Jun 2012.

Redner, Charles. Down But Never Out. Open Books Press, Feb. 2010.

Work cited:

Makinde, Adeyinka.  Democracy, Terrorism and the Secret State: From the Era of Gladio to the War on Terror. GlobalResearch.ca, Jan. 2013.

Cited in the following book:

Paterson, Graham L. A Constitutional Journey. Xlibris, Feb. 2013.

Work cited:

Makinde, Adeyinka. The Politics of Anthony Mundine. Eastsideboxing.com, Oct.  2001.

Cited in the following book:

Sarra, Chris. Strong and Smart – Towards a Pedagogy for Emancipation: Education for First Peoples (Part of New Studies in Critical Realism and Education Series). Routledge, Aug. 2012.

Academic Journals

Work cited:

Makinde, Adeyinka. DICK TIGER: The Life and Times of a Boxing Immortal. Word Association, May 2005.

Cited in the following journal:

Gennaro, Michael. “The Whole Place is in Pandemonium: Dick Tiger versus Gene Fullmer III and the Consumption of Boxing in Nigeria.” The International Journal of the History of Sport, Volume 30, Issue 16 2013.

Work cited:

Makinde, Adeyinka.  Retreading Hagler Versus Hearns. Eastsideboxing.com, Apr. 2002.

Cited in the following journal:

Ehrlichman, Brad. “In This Corner: An Analysis of Federal Boxing Legislation.” Columbia Journal of Law & the Arts. May 2011.

Academic Textbooks

Work cited:

Makinde, Adeyinka. Pug of Ages: Weep For Me. Cyberboxingzone.com, Oct. 2002.

Reproduced in the following textbook:

Brassil, John et al. Writing the Synthesis Essay. Peoples Education, 2007.

Reference Books

Work cited:

Makinde, Adeyinka. DICK TIGER: The Life and Times of a Boxing Immortal. Word Association, May  2005.

Cited in the following books:

The Editors of Salem Press. Great Athletes – Boxing & Soccer (Volume 1 of a 12-Volume set). Salem Press, Sept. 2014.

Grasso, John. Historical Dictionary of Boxing. Scarecrow Press, Jan. 2014.

Akyeampong, Emmanuel K.; Gates, Henry Louis (Editors). Dictionary of African Biography. Oxford University Press, Dec. 2011.

Gates, Henry Louis; Higginbotham, Evelyn Brooks (Editors). The African-American National Biography. Oxford University Press. Mar. 2008.

Monday, 29 December 2014

Adeyinka Makinde - My Top Five Blogs for 2014

PHOTO: John Frederick Peto

 

1. A World War in the Offing: Why US-NATO Geo-Political Policy May Lead to a Third World War (Sept. 2014)


2. The Ukraine Crisis: The Case for Russia (March 2014)


3. The Crisis of ISIS – A Debacle of a Great Game in Iraq and Syria (August 2014)


4. Citations of the Writings of Adeyinka Makinde (November 2014)


5. Neighborhood Bully: Deconstructing the Lyrics of Bob Dylan in the light of the Gaza Crisis (July 2014)


(C) Adeyinka Makinde (2014)

Thursday, 11 December 2014

Elvis: Ruminations on Elvis Presley and Black America

Elvis

The thing about Elvis is that any misgivings about him as a man who 'copied' or 'stole' Afro-American music is that it has to be understood that he came from the dominant culture who would only accept one who was of them as number one.

There was an aesthetic aspect as well because there were talented white artists who could not be promoted in the manner that he was because they did not have the 'looks'.

He definitely adapted a great degree of his overall style and packaging: singing, moving (apart from the later karate stuff) and clothing from observing and imbibing the cultural impulse of black America.

One huge strike against him was his Southern roots and the whole negativity of the black experience in that part of the United States under the respective regimes of slave society and later, ‘Jim Crow’ Apartheid.

There were always all sorts of rumours about his racial attitudes. “I could never kiss a Mexican (or black) woman”, “Niggers are only good for shining my shoes” and so on. I don’t think they were definitively corroborated.

He was however constricted by the racial mores of the time. His friend Sammy Davis Jr said Elvis told him that he wished they could both make a movie together but that his audience base (meaning whites and particularly those from below the ‘Mason-Dixon Line’) would not accept it.

Did this demonstrate a certain spinelessness and lack of moral courage on his part? Or was he just being pragmatic?

There are those who feel that he could and should have done more to break down racial barriers. Others feel that just the way he expressed his music and his giving credit to those blacks who had influenced him was enough.

He fell in to self parody and despite his amazing ‘comeback’ show on TV and a revival of sorts in Las Vegas, the case can be forcefully made that his best and most essential work was in the two or three year period that followed the inception of his career.

He stands accused of wasting his talent on terrible Hollywood movies, wearing tacky stage attires, and not attempting to write his own songs and push the boundaries of his creativity in the age of The Beatles, Bob Dylan and later of the introspective singer-songwriters.

Many of his fans are just content that he was what he was regardless. A guy who could sing a many styles with great aplomb and who paved the way for countless black and white musicians.

That may be cold comfort for the militant black school of thought that postulates him as a "straight-up racist" who was “simple and plain”. His pelvic gyrations; a pale imitation of more ‘robustly’ physical and sensual movements by a multitude of earlier R & B performers mark him down for ridicule and even disdain:

“If Elvis is King, who is James Brown; God?” wrote Amiri Baraka.

But it should not be forgotten that Elvis took risks by being a pioneer in his adaptation of black culture. He received huge stick for perpetuating what some of his Southern brethren were referring to as “degenerate nigger music” and the threat it posed to the social order by the fact that blacks and whites were digging his music whether listening to it on the radio or live at (segregated) venues.

He was odd in many ways. Much has been made of the way in which he conducted his private life. But this had a lot to do with his living within a kind of fame that few humans could comprehend. So many people often remember how well mannered and humble he appeared to be in his interactions.

He may not be ‘The King’ to all, and the devotion shown to him by many of his fans may appear over the top and devoid of rationality, but his impact on the course of music history cannot be denied and should not be denigrated.

(C) Adeyinka Makinde (2014)


Adeyinka Makinde is a London-based writer.


Monday, 8 December 2014

Stephen King’s ‘11/22/63’: A Cogitation on Dick Tiger, Boxing and President Kennedy


The genius of Stephen King’s engaging dramas of popular literature has consistently involved the author’s adeptness at creating a narrative full of complex backgrounds that are inhabited by characters possessing the ineluctable quality of drawing upon the reservoir of empathetic responses from his readers.

These fictional characters often represent credible composites of the spectrum of the human psychological condition: from the characterisations of supernaturally directed protagonists to the ordinary ones, they have proved memorable because of the realism with which they are imbued.

The challenge for King in ‘11/22/63’ was to realistically portray historical figures in his foray into the genre of historical fiction. However, the international bestselling novelist left many of his fans who are boxing followers rather peeved at his representation of Dick Tiger in the book which was published back in November 2011.

It is the story of a man named Jake Epping, a high school teacher from Maine, who is transported back in time in order to try to prevent the assassination of President John F. Kennedy.

He’s actually transported to 1958 and has to live for five more years in order to achieve his task. So Epping sustains himself by placing bets on major sporting events - the final one of which involves Tiger, and which he watches via close circuit television at the Dallas Civic Auditorium.

Thus, Tiger enters the story in August of 1963 when he suffers an upset fifth round defeat to an ‘older’ fictional journeyman Texan named Tom ‘The Hammer’ Case at New York City’s Madison Square Garden.

The scenario is implausible; even shocking for historically-minded boxing fans. And while King’s storytelling style has not required him to be a stickler for detailed facts in the mould of an Arthur Hailey or James Michener, the decision to portray Tiger in these circumstances does not seemingly tally with that of a writer whose research for this novel encompassed “a six-foot high stack of books.”

Whereas King presents Tiger as a rising title contender, Tiger was in fact at the time the undisputed middleweight champion of the world. In August of 1963, he had successfully defended the crown he had won from Gene Fullmer the previous year against Fullmer in the Nigerian city of Ibadan in what had been Black Africa’s first staged world title bout – fully eleven years before the famous ‘Rumble in the Jungle’ between Muhammad Ali and George Foreman.

Tiger did lose a fight in 1963. His defeat in December of that year at the Atlantic City Convention Hall came against Joey Giardello.

But Giardello was a ‘real’ enough boxer; a talented box-puncher who had been a perennial contender for the world middleweight title which some observers felt had been denied him in a foul-filled contest against Fullmer in 1960.

Tiger did not lose by knockout to over-the-hill challengers in the early 1960s, or, come to think of it, in the latter part of his career when his sole knockout loss came by way of the incendiary fists of the legendary Bob Foster.

In 1968, Tiger was an ageing world light heavyweight champion who gave away a great deal of height, weight and reach to the almost decade younger Foster who at the time was already being acknowledged as an all-time division great.

‘Tom Case’s' defeat of Dick Tiger is puzzling.

Tiger was extremely durable. He had a formidable ‘chin’; boxing parlance for a pugilist apt at absorbing punches that would knockout or at least knockdown conventional foes. How else would he have survived two knockdowns against the paralyzing shots he had to absorb from the hard-hitting light heavyweight contender, Frankie DePaula?

How could he successfully neutralise many of a generation of the middleweight division’s all-time finest who included the powerful punchers: Rubin ‘Hurricane’ Carter, Jose ‘Monon’ Gonzalez and Henry Hank?

And it wasn’t as if he designed a style which involved absorbing a lot of punches as was the approach of Joe Frazier. Tiger aptly evaded punches by a deft combination of head movement and footwork. His noble countenance captured in the aftermath of his retirement; bereft of lumps or scars, testified to this.

Interestingly enough given King’s book’s portrayal of the outcome of Tiger’s fictional bout as having some bearing on the protagonist’s objective in regard to Kennedy, it is worth noting that the late president did have some awareness of Dick Tiger’s career.   

In a satellite telephone conversation with the Nigerian Prime Minister Abubaker Tafawa Balewa in August of 1963, Kennedy had light-heartedly interjected that “we look forward to having Dick Tiger come over here”

Perhaps he had been briefed beforehand by a member of staff to mention Tiger’s name as part of a charm offensive in a brief conversation with another world leader. But then again JFK had some credentials as a bona fide boxing fan.

He had watched heavyweight champion Floyd Patterson defend his title against Tom McNeely by close circuit feed at the White House in December of 1961. One month after the bout, he met Patterson at the White House in between his Oval Office meetings with the ambassadors from Ireland and China. Patterson had found Kennedy’s knowledge of boxing to be a “pleasant revelation”.

The president had also taken the trouble to respond to Joey Giardello’s invitation to watch his challenge to Dick Tiger’s crown in December of 1963. Kennedy responded that his busy schedule would not allow for that.

Giardello received the reply the day after the president’s assassination.

In his heyday Tiger’s accomplishments as a pugilist were of such substance that his name was on the lips of political leaders such as Ghana’s Kwame Nkrumah as well as on the Honours List of Queen Elizabeth of Britain.

He lent his great name and the weight of his reputation to the cause of Biafran separation.

But it was in the last halcyon era of boxing at Madison Square Garden; the Mecca of the sport where the fans worshipped this granite hewn, down-to-earth and humble practitioner of the manly art plying his trade on the squared ring canvas below the brilliant glare of klieg lights that Tiger’s name was most assuredly spoken and his craft adoringly appreciated.

They had seen him lose; invariably on points to fleet-footed practitioners who could contrive to evade his great strength, but the thought to them of an over-the-hill journeyman knocking out one of the most resilient fighters in middleweight history would have been almost beyond the limits of their collective imagination.

But then again King’s novel is about ‘alternative history’. It is fiction.

It is pure fantasy.

Adeyinka Makinde is the author of DICK TIGER: The Life and Times of a Boxing Immortal..

Saturday, 29 November 2014

Citations of the Writings of Adeyinka Makinde


CITATIONS OF MY WORKS - SUMMARY

Books

The Commonwealth Games: Extraordinary Stories Behind the Medals
Oliver, Brian
Publisher: Bloomsbury Sport
Date: May 2014

Work cited: ‘Dick Tiger: The Life and Times of a Boxing Immortal’
Author: Adeyinka Makinde
Publisher: Word Association
Year: 2005


I Pugni Degli Eroi
Torromeo, Dario; Esposito, Franco
Publisher: Absolutely Free Editore
Date: Dec 2013

Work cited: ‘Dick Tiger: The Life and Times of a Boxing Immortal’
Author: Adeyinka Makinde
Publisher: Word Association
Year: 2005


A Constitutional Journey
Paterson, Graham L.
Publisher: Xlibris
Date: Feb. 2013

Work cited: ‘Democracy, Terrorism and the Secret State’
Author: Adeyinka Makinde
Publisher: GlobalResearch.ca
Year: 2013

There Was A Country: A Personal History of Biafra
Achebe, Chinua
Publisher: Allen Lane
Date: Sept. 2012

Work cited: ‘Dick Tiger: The Life and Times of a Boxing Immortal’
Author: Adeyinka Makinde
Publisher: Word Association
Year: 2005

Strong and Smart – Towards a Pedagogy for Emancipation: Education for First Peoples (Part of New Studies in Critical Realism and Education Series)
Sarra, Chris
Publisher: Routledge
Date: August 2012

Work cited: ‘The Politics of Anthony Mundine’
Author: Adeyinka Makinde
Publisher: eastsideboxing.com
Year: 2001

Game Plan: A Social History of Sport in Alberta
Hall, Karen L.
Publisher: University of Alberta Press
Date: June 2012

Work cited: ‘Dick Tiger: The Life and Times of a Boxing Immortal’
Author: Adeyinka Makinde
Publisher: Word Association
Year: 2005

Boxing in America: An Autopsy
Hudson, David L.
Publisher: Praeger Publishers
Date: June 2012

Work cited: ‘Dick Tiger: The Life and Times of a Boxing Immortal’
Author: Adeyinka Makinde
Publisher: Word Association
Year: 2005

Down But Never Out
Redner, Charles
Publisher: Open Books Press
Date: Feb. 2010

Work cited: ‘Dick Tiger: The Life and Times of a Boxing Immortal’
Author: Adeyinka Makinde
Publisher: Word Association
Year: 2005

Academic Journals

The Whole Place is in Pandemonium: Dick Tiger versus Gene Fullmer III and the Consumption of Boxing in Nigeria
Gennaro, Michael
Journal: The International Journal of the History of Sport
Year: 2013
Publisher: Taylor & Francis

Work cited: ‘Dick Tiger: The Life and Times of a Boxing Immortal’
Author: Adeyinka Makinde
Publisher: Word Association
Year: 2005

In This Corner: An Analysis of Federal Boxing Legislation
Ehrlichman, Brad
34 Colum. JL & the Arts 421 (2010-2011)
Journal: Columbia Journal of Law & the Arts
Date: 2011

Work cited: ‘Retreading Hagler Versus Hearns’
Author: Adeyinka Makinde
Publication: eastsideboxing.com
Year: 2002

Academic Textbooks

Writing the Synthesis Essay
Brassil, John et al
Publisher: Peoples Education
Year: 2007

Work Reproduced: ‘Pug of Ages: Weep For Me’
Author: Adeyinka Makinde
Publisher: cyberboxingzone.com
Year: 2002

Reference Books

Great Athletes – Boxing & Soccer (Volume 1 of a 12-Volume set)
The Editors of Salem Press
Publisher: Salem Press
Date: Sept. 2014

Work cited: ‘Dick Tiger: The Life and Times of a Boxing Immortal’
Author: Adeyinka Makinde
Publisher: Word Association
Year: 2005

Historical Dictionary of Boxing
Grasso, John
Publisher: Scarecrow Press
Date: Jan. 2014

Work cited: ‘Dick Tiger: The Life and Times of a Boxing Immortal’
Author: Adeyinka Makinde
Publisher: Word Association
Year: 2005

Dictionary of African Biography
Editors: Akyeampong, Emmanuel K.; Gates, Henry Louis
Publisher: Oxford University Press
Date: Dec. 2011


Work cited: ‘Dick Tiger: The Life and Times of a Boxing Immortal’
Author: Adeyinka Makinde
Publisher: Word Association
Year: 2005


The African-American National Biography 
Editors: Gates, Henry Louis; Higginbotham, Evelyn Brooks 
Publisher: Oxford University Press 
Date: Mar. 2008

Work cited: ‘Dick Tiger: The Life and Times of a Boxing Immortal’
Author: Adeyinka Makinde
Publisher: Word Association
Year: 2005

CITATIONS OF MY WORKS - NOTES

My writing has been cited by a range of researchers –scholars, a world renowned literary figure, an activist for constitutional reform in Australia and established writers for trade published books.

This has encompassed the following:

• Books 
• Academic Journals
• an Academic Textbook
• Reference Books

My most referenced work is that of my first book, DICK TIGER: The Life and Times of a Boxing Immortal which placed the life and career of a world champion pugilist in the context of the political, social and cultural history of Nigeria as well as elements of these factors as related to his sojourns in the United Kingdom and the United States.

Several essays and commentaries of mine have also been referenced.

The stature of the authors who have referenced my work as well as the subject matter and themes of the works they have respectively undertaken, I would aver, vindicate the value of my writing in terms of the depth of research, the quality of writing as well as my analytical perspectives.

Books

My work has been cited in the following books:

• The Commonwealth Games: Extraordinary Stories Behind the Medals

• I Pugni degli Eroi (Fist of Heroes)
• A Constitutional Journey
• There Was A Country: A Personal History of Biafra
• Strong and Smart – Towards a Pedagogy for Emancipation: Education for First Peoples (Part of New Studies in Critical Realism and Education Series)
• Boxing in America: An Autopsy
• Game Plan: A Social History of Sport in Alberta
• Down But Never Out

The Commonwealth Games: Extraordinary Stories Behind the Medals (Bloomsbury Sport) 2014

In this selected history of the Commonwealth Games, my book, ‘DICK TIGER: The Life and Times of a Boxing Immortal’ is cited and my personal comments are quoted by the author in the context of the story of Emmanuel Ifeajuna, the first black African to win a gold medal in any sport in any international event. Ifeajuna became a national hero in Nigeria in the 1950s but during the 1960s, as an army officer, became embroiled in a military coup and the ensuing Nigerian Civil War during which he was executed by firing squad by the government of the secessionist republic of Biafra for high treason.

My book is used as a source for this segment of the book as the author, Brian Oliver, used the subject of my book, Dick Tiger, as a point of comparison. Both men were members of the ethnic Igbo group who became heroes to the Nigerian public in the pre- and post-independence period. However, both fell in the esteem of the public for supporting the Biafran project with the attendant cost to the legacy of each man.

Brian Oliver was the Sports Editor of The Observer from 1998 to 2011 where he was the co-inventor of the Observer Sport Monthly.

I Pugni degli Eroi (Absolutely Free Editore) 2013

This Italian language book, the title of which translates as 'Fists of Heroes', cites my book, ‘DICK TIGER: The Life and Times of a Boxing Immortal’. 'I Pugni degli Eroi', covers the stories of a selection of 46 champion boxers all of whom had a common denominator: that of rousing the passions of fans and non-aficionados as national and trans-national heroes. The relevant chapter, 'Tiger: Piedone l'Africano', specifically acknowledges my presentation of the life story of this boxer as bearing the "characteristics of an extraordinary adventure novel." 


Dario Torromeo is an award-winning Italian sports journalist who writes for Corriere dello Sport - Stato, one of the three major Italian sports daily newspapers. His co-writer, Franco Esposito is a veteran sports journalist of over half a century's experience. 

A Constitutional Journey (Xlibris) 2013

An essay of mine entitled ‘Democracy, Terrorism and the Secret State: From the Era of Gladio to the War on Terror’; published via globalresearch.ca is cited and a segment of my prose quoted in the context of a philosophical discourse by the author on the role of government.

The author, Brian L. Paterson is a retired Australian businessman who has been involved in constitutional issues related to his country for almost three decades during which time he has made submissions to Constitutional Conventions, given speeches to groups and developed a Constitutional Review System.

There Was A Country: A Personal History of Biafra (Allen Lane) 2012

‘DICK TIGER: The Life and Times of a Boxing Immortal’ is cited by the late literary figure Chinua Achebe in his memoir of the Nigerian Civil War which lasted from 1967 to 1970. The protagonist in my book, as was the case with Achebe himself, became a propagandist for the cause of Biafran secession. The memoir refers to the segment in my book when the world champion boxer enlists into the Biafra Army and is commissioned as a second lieutenant into the Morale Corps of the rebel army.

Achebe’s memoir also references the career record of Dick Tiger that I produced after the research for my book was completed. The revised record provided boxing historians and record keepers clarification on the early part of the fighter’s career in Nigeria.

Strong and Smart – Towards a Pedagogy for Emancipation: Education for First Peoples (Part of New Studies in Critical Realism and Education Series) (Routledge) 2012

A 2001 commentary of mine, ‘The Politics of Anthony Mundine’ is cited in this work by an Australian Aboriginal academic Dr. Chris Sarra. The book is partly biographical but also utilises the ‘critical realism’ theory of Roy Bhaskar as a template for Aboriginal Australians to transform their social condition.

My commentary was a critical appraisal of a famous Australian boxer of Aboriginal descent, Anthony Mundine, and the fall out created by remarks he made after the September 11th attacks in America. Sarra cites my work in the context of a discourse on contemporary Aboriginal heroes including Mundine who he argues is a positive role model despite the opprobrium often heaped upon this outspoken figure by white Australians.

Boxing in America: An Autopsy (Praeger Publishers) 2012

My work ‘DICK TIGER: The Life and Times of a Boxing Immortal’ is referenced in this book, a critique of boxing as a force in the cultural and sporting history of the United States.

The author David L. Hudson is an adjunct professor of law at Vanderbilt University who is a First Amendment scholar as well as a sports writer.

Game Plan: A Social History of Sports in Alberta (University of Alberta Press) 2012

‘Not a Visiting Apprentice’; chapter 6 of my book ‘DICK TIGER: The Life and Times of a Boxing Immortal’ is cited in Game Plan, a book which examines the social and cultural importance of sports in the Canadian state of Alberta from the 1880s to the present.

The area culled by Karen L. Wall relates to the Commonwealth middleweight title bouts fought respectively in 1960 and 1961 between the subject of my book and Wilf Greaves, a Canadian boxing champion.

The author holds a Phd and is an Associate Professor in the Communications Studies Program at Athabasca University, Alberta.

Down But Never Out (Open Books Press) 2010

‘DICK TIGER: The Life and Times of a Boxing Immortal’ is cited and text reproduced by the author Charles Redner in this book which serves as a parallel biography of a former world middleweight boxing champion, Joey Giardello –who was an opponent of the subject of my book- and his mentally handicapped son Carmine. After a narrative on his career, the book focuses on Giardello’s role in charities associated with aiding children with special needs as well as his part in the creation of the Special Olympics.

Academic Journals

My work has been cited in the following journals:

• The International Journal of the History of Sport
• Columbia Journal of Law & the Arts

International Journal of the History of Sport

‘The Whole Place is in Pandemonium: Dick Tiger versus Gene Fullmer III and the Consumption of Boxing in Nigeria’ which appeared in a 2013 edition of the International Journal of the History of Sport references a great deal of DICK TIGER: The Life and Times of a Boxing Immortal’, my biography of this pioneer African fighter and its coverage of the first ever world boxing championship fight in Black Africa – a bout which occurred more than a decade before the famous title bout between Muhammad Ali and George Foreman in Zaire.

The author Michael Gennaro, a history lecturer, is a doctoral candidate at the University of Florida. Its ‘Center for African Studies’ is by a reliable estimation one of the best funded of its kind in the United States.

Columbia Journal of Law & the Arts

A product of the Law School of Ivy Leagued Columbia University, the journal is a quarterly publication which covers “all aspects of law and the arts, entertainment, media and intellectual property, both domestic and international”.

‘In This Corner: An Analysis of Federal Boxing Legislation’ which appeared in the spring 2011 edition of the Columbia Journal of the Law & the Arts was an article appraising the record of Congress’s legislative intervention in the corrupt and brutal world of boxing. The writer references a work of mine entitled ‘Retreading Hagler versus Hearns’; a commentary that analysed an excitingly brutal world middleweight title confrontation which, from the writer’s perspective, formed the often two-sided coin that permeates boxing’s folklore; that is the tales of great fights, indomitable courage etcetera on the one side and on the other darker side, the tales of exploitation and unethical business practices.

The author Brad Ehrlichman is a New York City trial lawyer earned the accolade of James Kent Scholar and Harlan Fiske Stone Scholar at Columbia Law School.

Academic Textbooks

My work has been cited in the following academic textbook:

• Writing the Synthesis Essay

Writing the Synthesis Essay

My commentary ‘Pug of Ages: Weep for Me’ was reproduced in its entirety for a segment in an English language textbook geared towards developing the critical thinking skills of senior high school students preparing to enter higher education institutions in America.

The articles selected by the editors revolved around an exploration of a range of contentious issues: genetics, boxing, beauty and war. Each of the articles contained within the ‘cluster’ of themed sections is followed by a series of questions.

‘Pug of Ages: Weep for Me’ explores the economic, social and cultural issues historically and contemporarily associated with professional boxing including racism, financial exploitation, unethical business practices and the involvement of organised crime.

My work appears alongside reproductions of works by Joyce Carol Oates; the distinguished American author/novelist and English language professor, and William Hazlitt, famed for his humanistic essays and literary criticism: in Oates’s case an excerpt from her seminal book ‘On Boxing’ and Hazlitt, his famed 1822 essay, ‘The Fight’. Another contributor Gordon Marino of Saint Olaf College in Minnesota, a philosophy professor, is the Curator of the Hong Kierkegaard Library.

Reference Books

My work has been cited in the following reference books:

• Great Athletes – Boxing & Soccer
• Historical Dictionary of Boxing
• Dictionary of African Biography

• The African-American National Biography

Great Athletes – Boxing & Soccer (Volume 1 of a 12-Volume set)

My book ‘DICK TIGER: The Life and Times of a Boxing Immortal’ is referenced in this, the “largest and most comprehensive collection of sports biographies published in a single reference work”.

Historical Dictionary of Boxing

My biography on Dick Tiger is referenced in this undertaking which covers boxing’s history from 688 B.C. to 2012 AD. It is published under the auspices of Scarecrow Press an American publisher best-known for “providing quality scholarly, general interest and reference works for the patrons of Public Schools and Academic libraries, as well as professional books for the librarians that serve them.”

Dictionary of African Biography (6-Volume set)

Again, my book on Dick Tiger was relied on for source information in constructing a profile of the pugilist in this “major biographical dictionary covering the lives and legacies of notable men and women from all eras and walks of life".


Both editors are Harvard University academics; Emmanuel Akyeampong being a Professor of History of History and of African and African-American Studies and Henry Louis Gates, the Alphonse Fletcher University Professor and the Director of the W.E.B. Du Bois Institute for African and African American-American Research.

The African-American National Biography (8-Volume set)

The Dick Tiger biography is referenced in an eight-volume reference set containing over 4,000 entries "written and signed by distinguished scholars" under the direction of Editors in Chief Henry Louis Gates and Evelyn Brooks Higginbotham. Higginbotham, like Gates, is a Harvard scholar where she is a professor of History and African American Studies. These volumes are touted as "the most significant and expansive compilation of black lives in print today".